The Executioner – Episode 5

As promised, here goes episode 5 of “The Executioner”, publisher approved and re-edited. Stay tuned next Friday for episode 6, and every week for much more . . .

Novel synopsis:

When she meets heartthrob Damian Novac, shy student Alice develops a heavy crush against her best wishes. Hoping to get close to him, she joins Damian and friends on a winter trip in the Carpathian Mountains – a choice that will change her life abruptly.

When the train derails in high snow, they seek refuge at an abandoned cottage, but soon people of their group start losing their minds and dying. Alice barely escapes with Damian and some of their friends, only to realize she’s far from safe even back home. A shady corporation which conducts experiments on humans and which seems to have ‘engineered’ Damian into something monstrous many years before is on their trail.

A man of secrets and obscure powers, Damian might be a villain or a hero. Though aware of the danger he poses, she can’t fight the obsession that will draw her ever deeper. Will Damian become her lover or her executioner?

Episode 5

forbiddenlove

Pic source.

CHAPTER VII

“I’m your daughter, you really believe I’d betray your secrets?” – stab in the chest. As I don’t betray Dad’s. “All right, may I die in chains, if a word on this leaves my mouth,” I went for one of the many gypsy oath formulations I’d learned in Ruxandra’s home.

Mom shuddered. “Not like that, please. Your word suffices. Keep this all to yourself, for your own good.”

“No need to elaborate on that. Elaborate on extracted.”

Deep breath, gathering her nerves. “Tiberius has been working with the Intelligence Service for years, Alice. He’s been analyzing blood samples they delivered him, samples that came from dangerous thugs. The results were always classified, your father never spoke of them. But when he began receiving samples from so-called BioDhrome agents, he withdrew in his shell like a turtle. Still, his baffled face spoke volumes. Even when he grew more accustomed to whatever he discovered, it took its toll on him. It almost drove him insane, which cost us many midnight fights.” Her voice trailed off, lost in painful memory.

“Tell me about it,” I whispered. All those late nights when Dad tiptoed to the master bedroom, the quiet quarrels they thought I didn’t hear, played like a movie in my head. All those empty weekends, Mom sunken in her books and I in mine, Dad only a picture on a shelf, even though he was still of this world.

“I put him under pressure for years to quit what he was doing. I imagine that’s why his heart grew cold to me, and he began seeking comfort elsewhere. Oh, dear baby, I haven’t asked – some coffee? Tea?”

With the premiere of her confession on my shoulders, I nodded, and Mom put a kettle on the stove. I let her decide on whether coffee or tea and moved a few inches in to let her sit by me and slip a loving arm around my back, as if to support me through what she’d say next.

“Your father is a BioDhrome target. He’s been one for a long time. So the R.I.S. took him in when we were still at the hospital in Brasov. He’s safe with them.”

“How can you be sure?” Worry broke through my voice, no matter how hard I tried to keep it chained.

“Because there’s nothing safer than R.I.S. protection in this country.”

“The few words I exchanged with him back at the hospital, he didn’t seem anxious about his life. He wanted to stay here, with us.”

“Without protection, two of his colleagues have been killed, Alice. People who worked with Intelligence Services in Barcelona and Bristol, also in matters related to genetic research. The R.I.S. are certain BioDhrome was the author, and that Tiberius is a target of greatest importance to them too. Therefore he’s a risk factor in this house, for us and for himself. Now that he’s out of the picture we’re safer, but still. Officer Sorescu, the man you saw in here . . .” even more careful now, “He’s around with his colleagues, just in case. Ruxandra and George will be staying with us, it narrows down the number of places that need surveillance.”

“Does this mean we’re confined to these walls?”

“No, you’ll be free to live your life almost as you did before. The police, the R.I.S. and the doctors, they all agree that the trauma will be slow to leave you, so a normal life is essential. Especially public places are benefic. Crowds are safe.”

She smiled as if this were supposed to thrill me like alcohol would a teen. And it did, to a certain extent. Crowds, places like the campus and even clubs were safe indeed in our town, the built-in curiosity of people would let no event unobserved. It worked better than CCTV, so there was strong reason to believe that BioDhrome wouldn’t risk an action in open field. They’d try to get us alone, at night in lonely places or even in our homes. So surveillance made sense.

But the feeling that Dad had been extracted against his will nagged. He’d been desperate like never before at the hospital, his tone had left no room for doubt. He’d been convinced that he could protect us, especially by being present.

“And if we want to talk to him? Is there some number we can call? Some place we can go, for example, I don’t know, a phone cabin downtown like in those detective movies or something?”

“We can contact Detective Varlam.”

“I see.” I was unable to control an acid grin. So this is how Hector was forcing cooperation. By leaving us no way around him. On a second thought, what if extraction was no more than a cover? A gross lie? What if he’d thrown Dad in a nasty cell and punched and kicked information on Damian Novac out of him? I jumped to my feet, bumping into the table edge. My ears whistled in tune with the kettle on the stove.

“Well, I’d like a word with him right now,” I spat.

Mom stood up, too, hand on my cheek to calm me down, blue eyes identical to mine wide and worried. Standing a head taller though, she made me feel like a kid again.

“Alice, honey, the whole idea behind this was to keep contact slim. Why bother organizing an extraction, if family stops by at the hideout to say hello anytime they please?”

“And you accept this so easily?” I snapped and brushed her hand off. “Are you really not worried about him, not one bit? His absence doesn’t bother you in the least?”

Now it was Mom’s turn to frown and apply a hard edge to her voice. “It’s not much difference to the last years, is it?”

“But this is different, Mom! You have no idea what we’ve been through up there, in the mountains. BioDhrome is serious shit, they’re really deep trouble!”

“Exactly! I am worried about your father, Alice, believe me, but yes, I admit, I’m more worried about you. Officer Sorescu even thinks that this attack on your group was meant at kidnapping you, in order to force Tiberius to turn himself in to them. To BioDhrome. So if his presence puts you in danger, then I don’t need or want to see him again until the afterlife.”

Her words sent a stab through my brain, but I kept protest and anger behind tightened lips. Mom’s honesty was sharp, like glass colliding with glass in her voice, leaving no trace of the vulnerability she’d put in her confession. Moreover, Dad had been cheating on her for a long time and she knew that. I happened to know even with whom. Indeed, why should she give a shit. I tried for a peace-making tone.

“But I wouldn’t be seeing him, Mom. I’ll just talk to Detective Varlam, make sure Dad’s all right. I need details.”

“I know you’re hard to assure of anything, sweetheart. You have a counterargument ready for anything, you’re able to question even the law of gravity, and I think you’re taking it too far sometimes. That’s why I’m telling you now: your father is safe and sound, take that for granted.”

Mom wasn’t the dictator Dad could often be, but when she stood for something there was no way past her will. Behind the mask of the kind, soft-spoken Madame Jenna everyone appreciated, she had ways of getting what she wanted, brains to bow to and the patience of a reptile. On days like this, I ate my heart out for not having inherited at least half of everything she was.

Still, I found the guts to try and make up a strategy around her in my head, but before it caught shape I heard the door from the antechamber to my room. Then light steps. Ruxandra’s steps. The knock on the doorframe to signal her presence was accompanied by a weak smile.

Her pretty face had lost much of its glow, her olive complexion now pale in its own way, her hair a washed-out black, rumpling down to her waist. Her jaw was locked despite the smile. The experience we’d been through had taken away what was left of her carefree self, I would say, and Ruxandra had become a twenty-two-year-old veteran of fight for survival.

Mom smiled back and hurried to pour her a cup of coffee, eager to cover the subject of our conversation. Ruxandra relished in Mom’s warm welcome like an orphan would in a Christmas night with presents, and joined me at the table, huddled in my old pink bathrobe that came too short on her arms and legs.

They were all “Rux, dear,” and “Jenna” to each other, as always. They had a special relationship. Mom had made a life purpose of plunging deep into the troubles of the gypsy minority, she had dedicated them her time even though there was no trophy to be won. Rich wives of the Western World she came from did charity, Mom had told me, but she didn’t think much of it. “Raising funds for clerks. Trust me, half of the donated money ends up on their pay-checks,” she’d say.

But Mom was determined to be of use on a very personal, palpable level and made a great ‘career’ of social work. Many of the gypsy kids in our neighborhood, Ruxandra and her sister Saveta included, had listened to her winter stories and learned to read and write from her. Both Romanian and English. It had been Mom who’d helped Ruxandra’s mother leave her husband and find a job at the textile factory many years ago. She’d fought and achieved so much in those difficult times. A rush of admiration swept over me, and a smile drew my lips. My heroine.

Ruxandra took a long sip of coffee, fingers curled around the mug, then leant her head back, savoring not only the aroma but also her surroundings. There was love in her gaze as it crossed over every detail of the room – The cluttered wooden cupboards nailed to the walls over the counter, the door to the back garden with its dusty glass pane, the pots, kettles and spoons dangling from a wooden stripe with hooks above the sink like bells waiting to be played.

“I’ve missed this place,” she said, her hand gently stroking the nylon table cover.

Mom gave her a warm smile. “It’s missed you, too.”

Despite the promising start, the conversation got stuck as soon as Mom uttered a, “Did you sleep well?”. Ruxandra lowered her head and pressed her lips, as if not wanting to remember. But, if she’d had nightmares, I hadn’t noticed. She’d been still and quiet. Only George’s low moaning and sighing had reached me once in a while through the veil of light sleep.

Mom tried to guide Ruxandra back on the conversational track, but all she got were attempted smiles from the trembling corner of her mouth. She wasn’t quite herself, that much was obvious. But then again, neither was I.

Mom’s insistences on tea, cookies, coffee, chocolate, marmalade and another dozen sweets per minute were a clear sign I was a disturbing sight too. I wasn’t even sure to perceive and answer all her questions, I had this feeling they’d passed by my ears more than once, like deja heards or something.

George woke up late in the afternoon. His sudden screams as if someone were slicing him alive made us all jump, and Mom almost threw down the door to the antechamber to attend him. His pained groans sent chills down my back. Ruxandra slapped her palms over her face, her shoulders shaking in hard sobs.

Carefully, I took her in my arms. I threw a glance at the big, lazy clock on the highest shelf of the bookcase – it showed four in the afternoon. George had at least gotten a good chunk of sleep. Unlike Ruxandra and I, who hadn’t even found the energy to lose the pink nightgowns we still wore like overgrown babies, curled on the couch, TV on.

Without Mom to promptly switch channels as soon as the news came on, always packed with tragedies and subliminal, “This is the end of the world”, Ruxandra and I were now fully exposed to them. A report about a massacre at a remote cottage in the mountains of Bulgaria made us both lift out heads, teeth clenched, eyes bulging.

The twin of our story, only that no one had been found, dead or alive. The perfectly groomed reporter’s words were like another deja-heard, her voice matter-of-fact but disturbed in its depths. Her story was accompanied by censured images that played on the half of the screen next to her face.

“Blood on pieces of clothing and torn curtains. Broken windows and dried blood on shards of glass. Stains of blood…” And this is where my ears began buzzing, muffling the sound of the TV. My blood pressure must’ve shot up to the sky.

So this one made it on the news.

“They’ll cover up in a few days max,” Ruxandra said, close enough to my ear to pierce through the buzz.

“How could they? How could a footage like this be a mistake? They fucking filmed the mess. People are not stupid, Rux.”

“No, they aren’t. But there have been so many tragedies with so many explanations lately, that illegal experimentation won’t cross their minds. They’ll accept any animal attack, serial killer, drugs and orgies that ended up badly, you name it.”

Then the reporter said, “The police arrested Dr. Lazar Dobrev, a psychiatrist. He used to treat one of the missing persons, who’d been diagnosed with schizophrenia. Yet Dr. Dobrev set him on the loose. The man was known to have murderous compulsions, which he shouldn’t have had trouble acting on at a height of two meters and a hundred and seventy kilograms of muscle.”

To be continued.

***

Enjoyed this? Don’t keep it to yourself. Share your opinion with the writer, publisher and readers, we’re happy to hear from you. Stay tuned for episode 6 next Friday or subscribe at anaatcalin@gmail.com to receive notification at each new post.

Love,

Ana

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